Bangkok

Bangkok

Bangkok is the capital, largest urban area and primary city of Thailand. Known in Thai as Krung Thep Maha Nakhon (meaning “city of angels”), with a population of over eleven million inhabitants, by far its largest city. Its high-rise buildings, intense heat and naughty nightlife do not immediately give you a warm welcome — but don’t let your first impression mislead you. It is one of Asia’s most cosmopolitan cities with magnificent temples and palaces, authentic canals, busy markets and a vibrant nightlife that has something for everyone.

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Attraction Point

 1.     The Grand Palace

This palace has an area of 218,400 sq. metres and is surrounded by walls built in 1782. The length of the four walls is 1,900 metres. Within these walls are situated government offices and the Chapel Royal of the Emerald Buddha besides the royal residences.

When Siam restored law and order after the fall of Ayutthaya the monarch lived in Thonburi on the west side of the river. Rama I, on ascending the throne, moved the centre of administration to this side of the Chao Phraya; and, after erecting public monuments such as fortifications and monasteries, built a palace to serve not only as his residence but also his offices the various ministries, only one of which remains in the palace walls. This palace came to be known as the Grand Palace, in which the earliest edifices contemporary with the foundation of Bangkok were the two groups of residences named the Dusit Maha Prasat and the Phra Maha Monthian.

2.     he Chapel Royal of The Emerald Buddha (Wat Phra Kaew)

 

ust north of the Royal Residence of the Maha Monthian from which there is a connecting gate lies The Chapel Royal of The Emerald Buddha. It consists of all the architectural features of the monastery without however the residential quarter, for monks do not live here. The Assembly Hall, or Ubosoth, serves as the monarch’s private chapel. Hence the partition on either side of the main altar intended as a retiring room, which is never to be found anywhere else but the only other chapel royal, that of the King of Thonburi, which serves now as the Assembly Hall of the monastery of Arun within the former grounds of the palace of that king. The “Emerald Buddha” is carved from a block of jade. It is an object of national veneration and crowds come to pay respect to the memory of the Buddha and His Teachings on certain days of the weeks when it is open to the public.

 

 

 3.     Temple of Dawn (Wat Arun)

 

Wat Arun, the Temple of Dawn, is one of Bangkok’s best know landmark. It stands on the west bank of the Chao Phraya River in Thon Buri. Wat Arun is best seen from the opposite bank of the river; it glistens in the sunlight during the day and stands dark and noble at dawn or dusk. A visit to the beautiful, peaceful monastery complex surrounding the familiar towers is very worth-while. These towers, the “Phra Prang,” although best known, the only part of Wat Arun. It also contains narrow lanes; elegant, old white buildings; shrines, pools of turtles;and two fine giants, ” Yuk Wat Jaeng,” mortal enemies of the ” Yuk Wat Po” across the river. The monastery has existed for many years since the days when Ayutthaya was capital of Thailand.

4.     Wat Benchamabophit

 

 

 

Wat Benchamabophit is a temple compound of profound beauty and religious importance. Better known to foreigners as ‘the Marble Temple’, it is located close to Dusit palace. Wat Benchamabophit is not heavily promoted as a tourist destination, and therefore the number of foreign visitors is relatively small. If you stay in Bangkok for only one day, you could be forgiven for wanting to see the Grand Palace and Wat Pho only, but any longer stay should rightfully include a visit to the Marble Temple. The Ubosoth was constructed with Carrara marble from Italy, therefore the name.

Wat Benchamabophit is a royal monastery belonging to the first class ranking of Rajavaravihara. Few wats belong to this class. The wat was founded during the reign of King Chulalongkorn (Rama V) on 1 March 1900. Because of this date, it not long ago celebrated its centennial. That possibly is one of the reasons why the compound as a whole looks amazingly well maintained, with even the monks living quarters in bright unexpected colors.

5.     Ananta Samakhom Throne Hall

The Ananta Samakhom Throne Hall is a former reception hall within Dusit Palace in Bangkok, Thailand. It is now a museum.

One year after the completion of the Amphorn Satharn Villa within the Dusit Palace in 1906, King Chulalongkorn (Rama V) commissioned the construction of a reception hall to replace the one built during the reign of King Mongkut (Rama IV.).

The building in Italian Renaissance and Neo Classic style was commissioned to the architects Mario Tamagno and Annibale Rigotti. Marble from Carrara, Italy, and other foreign materials were used. Italian sculptor Vittorio Novi, who would later also work on the Mahaiudthit Bridge, was employed with his nephew Rudolfo Nolli.

The Throne Hall is a two storey construction with a large dome (49.5 m high) in the centre, surrounded by six smaller domes. The domes and walls are covered with paintings by Professor Galileo Chini and Carlo Riguli depicting the history of the Chakri Dynasty, from the first to the sixth reign.

 

 6.     Siam Paragon

Siam Paragon is a shopping mall in Bangkok, Thailand. It is one of the biggest shopping centers in Asia. Opened on December 9, 2005, it includes a wide range of specialty stores and restaurants as well as a multiplex movie theater (consisted of 15 large size theaters with one of the them having the biggest screen and seating capacity in Asia) and the Siam Ocean World (Underwater world) aquarium (the largest aquarium in South East Asia) and an exhibition hall and the Thai Art Gallery and also an opera concert hall. It also has a large bowling alley and karaoke center. It is a joint venture by Siam Piwat, the company that owns the adjacent Siam Center/Siam Discovery shopping malls, and The Mall Group, which also owns The Emporium. Siam Paragon has attracted large crowds since it opened.

 7.     Chatuchak Weekend Market

 

Chatuchak weekend market in Bangkok is the largest market in Thailand. Frequently called J.J., it covers over 35 acres (1.13 km²) and contains upwards of 5,000 stalls. It is estimated that the market receives 200,000 visitors each day. Most stalls only open on Saturdays and Sundays though Jatujak Plaza, the western section is open daily. In the North West corner is the J.J. Mall, with three floors of assorted oddments as well as eateries.

The market offers a wide variety of products including household items, clothing, Thai handicrafts, religious artifacts, collectibles, foods, and live animals. For tourists, there are a number of onsite companies who will send purchases abroad.

 8.     Yaowarat Road

 

Bangkok‘s Chinatown is centered on Yaowarat Road in Samphanthawong district. The Chinatown is an old business center covering a large area around Yaowarat and Charoen Krung Road. There are many small streets and alleys full of shops and vendors selling all types of goods. It has been the main centre for trading by the Chinese community since they moved from their old site some 200 years ago, Nearby Phahurat or Indian market. Yaowarat Road is also famous for many varieties of delicious foods, and become Foods Street in the night.